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Maltby Photographs

Maltby Crags

The crags surrounding Roche Abbey are of national importance for the plants that grow on and around them. They are a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI). Wild daffodils and ramsons blossom here, and although the elm trees have died out through Dutch Elm Disease, ash and oak have filled the spaces. There are many species of rare mosses and ferns in the crevices and the covering of ivy protects many plant and animal species.

Maltby Crags near Roche Abbey
Maltby Crags near Roche Abbey

They are also and a Regionally Important Geological Site (RIGs). The limestone gorge in which Roche Abbey stands was carved by torrential glacial meltwater from the ice cap about 2.5 million years ago which cut its was through the layers of Lower Magnesian Limestone (Cadeby Formation). This limestone consists of thick, hard, granular layers interspersed with thin fractured layers. The different strata in the limestone can be clearly seen in the cliff faces north of the Abbey. The thicker layer is a valuable building material which was used in the construction of the Abbey and in many other local buildings.

Roche Abbey

The remains of the abbey at Roche are a quiet contemplative place set in the valley of Maltby Dyke (known as Maltby Brook when I lived there). It is still surrounded by woodlands which are Sites of Special Scientific Interest. This is a damp area and in places, very damp indeed, and the monks who designed the abbey ditched, drained and built ponds and weirs to control the flow of water. I had always understood that the stone to build the Abbey was quarried locally but I've read another account that it was quarried at Kiveton and carted over to Maltby. I don't know which account is right.

Roche Abbey
Roche Abbey

War Memorial, Maltby

War Memorial Maltby
War Memorial Maltby
© Richard Croft

St Bartholomew's, Maltby

St Bartholomew's Church is situated on a quiet lane just off the main highways through Maltby. I was told, when I lived there, that it had been substantially rebuilt in the late 16th Century using stone from Roche Abbey. Many of the older cottages in the villages were also said to be built of recycled stone. Of course these may just be apocryphal tales.

St Bartholomews Maltby
St Bartholomew's Maltby

Cottages on Church Lane, Maltby

Church Close and Church Lane are two quiet little cul-de-sacs surrounding the church on which there are some nice old properties.

Cottages on Church Lane
Cottages on Church Lane, Maltby

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